carrots

Autumn On The Farm

Autumn at Rural Studio Farm is in full swing.

A student uses a sprayer to apply foliar fertilizer to growing plants with a good view of the farm

Some of the lingering warmer season crops are still yielding, like eggplant, peanuts, and bell peppers.

Mostly we have been busy planting seeds into soil blocks and direct-sowing with the push seeder. These crops are lettuces, mustard greens, baby brassica greens, carrots, beets, chard, collard greens, rutabagas, broccoli, radishes, spinach, hakurei (salad) turnips, and turnips.

Once the seedlings are ready, we prepare the beds and transplant out all the crops.

We have been reaping great harvests of many of these crops too, with all of Rural Studio’s daily green salads coming straight off the farm.

Now that the weather is beginning to cool, we have also been preparing for winter by sowing fall cover crops to leave in the field for overwintering. This ensures that there is always something growing in the beds, which helps with drainage and compaction and overall soil health. In the spring, these crops will be mowed down, adding good organic matter back into the soil.

Finally, we are also preparing the greenhouse for production over the winter, which is where most of Rural Studio’s food is grown in deep winter.

Crop Cycles

This week was marked with large harvests, which were the endings of some spring crop cycles, and seed starting in the seed house, the beginning of new crop cycles.

A close-up of harvested and washed carrots, both purple and orange

Thankfully, teaching faculty, Mary English, Steve Long, Emily McGlohn, and Xavier Vendrell all graciously volunteered their time to help farm manager Eric during this busy period.

Harvested spring crops included lettuces, carrots, collard greens, kale, cutting celery, turnips, arugula, beets, and scallions, as well as herbs like spearmint, dill, thyme, and oregano. Many of these commodities were eaten fresh, but the rest were given to the kitchen where chef Cat processed and stored large quantities for future meals once students have returned.

At the same time, Eric and Emily started seeds for late spring and summer. These future crops were zucchini and summer squash, determinate tomatoes for the field, eggplants, red and orange bell peppers, spicy peppers, and butternut squash.

Eric also planted seeds for various beneficial insect-attracting flowering plants, culinary and medicinal herbs, and perennial ornamentals. While many of these accessory plants do not yield tangible crops, they do confer other benefits on the farm, such as bringing pollinators, deterring pest insects, and aesthetic compensation. It is also a key feature of Rural Studio Farm to use a polyculture model, planting a wide diversity of different crops and flowering plants.