newbern

Howdy from Newbern!

A series of student Polaroids with title "Meet the Third Years"

1 HOWDY

  • Mediocre Superpower: ability to find other people’s keys, but never their own
  • Born in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand
  • Their lack of wisdom teeth is no indication of their lack of wisdom
  • Enjoys microwavable Mac n’ Cheese (to the rest of the house’s dismay)
  • On a free day, they enjoy doing chores, jamming to heavy metal, and planning schemes
  • May or may not own all the Lego pieces in the land
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2 BYE

  • Mediocre Superpower: being able to sleep through 50 alarms
  • Lived in Israel for a year as a baby
  • Continues to taunt the house with unfulfilled promises of Oreo Pie
  • Embarrassed of their Hufflepuffness
  • Their right ear is higher than the left one
  • Hates ‘Get-to-Know-You’ questionnaires
  • Believes the greatest cereal of all time is Lucky Charms
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3 GRAVITAS

  • Mediocre Superpower: be able to understand animals (only if they need something)
  • Is a cheesy person
  • Born and Raised in Houston
  • Loves spicy food
  • Only Ravenclaw of the house (smarticle particle)
  • Believes that people who close the bathroom door when they are done and leave everyone to wonder whether it is occupied or not should reevaluate.
  • Thinks the ‘Get-to-Know-You’ questionnaire made by the blog team is perfect (aaaaaaawww)
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4 MILK JAR

  • Mediocre Superpower: ability to know a penny’s life story when touched
  • Always eating popcorn before meals (never finishes their plate smh)
  • Speaks fluent Itali-English
  • Hides food from everyone else in the house and will eat your food if left unattended
  • Cheeseball Shark/ partial merperson
  • Undying love for Oreos and still waiting on the promised Oreo Pie
  • DeLiang’s least favorite actress
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5 RUN?

  • Mediocre Superpower: every time they reach into their pocket, they will find a single, random tree nut
  • The only Gryffindor of the house
  • Has secret ancient knowledge of strawberry juice
  • On a free day, they enjoy messing with Houdini (the famous escape artist not their dog)
  • Wants to learn VEX
  • Was caught off guard by their immense love of Twilight
  • Scared of photos
  • Unnaturally good at handstands
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6 READING OVEN

  • Mediocre Superpower: ability to stop time but only to procrastinate
  • Enjoys eating pie
  • Has visited a Glass Bridge (and it was beautiful)
  • Believes dust is the single worst menace to society
  • Loves road trips
  • Has more drill bits than any one person could ever need
  • Can fit a family of four in their giant tool belt
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7 TUMMPLE

  • Mediocre Superpower: the ability to speak any language but only to talk to people about their dogs
  • Is a very proud Hufflepuff
  • Their pinky toes don’t reach the ground
  • Lost the spelling bee in 3rd grade because ‘vacuum’ has 2 u’s
  • Parmesan cheese addict
  • Visited Hobbiton, New Zealand (where they should be because they are a hobbit)
  • Aims to imprison all Tummples
  • Inventor of Little Monsters TM, Newbern’s critically acclaimed board game

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A Responsible Return to Rural Studio

3rd years sit masked in the fabrication pavilion before eating lunch

The 3rd-year students are back in Newbern! Find out what they’re planning this semester in their first blog post here!

Out of Site

This week 3rd-years were introduced to two of their other courses taken at Rural Studio: Shop with Stephen Long and History with Dick Hudgens. While traditionally the Shop class focuses on a long-term project centered on the study and construction of a famous chair, this year students will be focusing on three smaller projects that can all be done during shop time. This will allow students to study wood construction more broadly as well as design some of the projects they are working on.

Dick Hudgens introduced his course with a bang as students walked around downtown Newbern making sketches of adjacent buildings and starting to learn some on-site drawing techniques. Similar to Long’s course adjustments, Hudgens has also adjusted the course syllabus to allow for more social distancing and safe meetings. As a result, all students drive their own cars to different historical sites and focus has been shifted from watercolor to more hand-drawing techniques.

20K Ophelia’s Home

Despite a rainy start to the semester, 3rd-years were able to get back onto 20K Ophelia’s Home project site mid-week on the first working week of the semester. Due to COVID-19 regulations in Spring 2020, progress on-site was sadly halted. However, these returning students and faculty have been eager to continue to work on this Rural Studio project. During the first few days on-site, 3rd-years were able to clean up the site and sort through materials in order to catalog how much material had been lost to weathering. 

With a new clean site, 3rd-years began prepping for the next week’s of work by building an on-site pin-up board as well as covering any exposed materials in preparation for another weekend of rain. Neither the rain nor the COVID-19 guidelines can dampen the spirits of the eager 3rd-years as they start the semester full of excitement and anticipation.

Students and instructors pose on site after a long day of work

Fabrication Pavilion

During what students and faculty loving refer to as “neck-down week,” a group of 3rd-years spent the week cleaning the fabrication pavilion and the yard in front of Morrisette House. While cleaning might not seem like the most glamorous task, it was a necessary task. The satisfaction that came with seeing a clean, beautiful pavilion was well worth the work. With an organized campus, the students are ready to start building.

Welcome Aboard the Storyboard

This week, the students’ five cabinet teams have been working hard on the design of their cabinets and of their fabrication process. To help students determine how their cabinets will be constructed, Steve and Chelsea implemented a design tool called a storyboard, which is a guide or instruction manual that documents the process, or evolution, of a built piece of work.

Storyboards flush out the order of procedure and give the students a method for testing the actual process of construction from start to finish. All of this work is helping the class move toward the fabrication of a built mockup, or prototype, of their final cabinets. These mockups will be reviewed as their midterm during the next weeks!

Auburn’s woodshop manager Jon Byler teaches the students how to use a CNC router

We had another special guest this week, this time from Auburn! Jon Byler, who operates the shop at CADC’s Dudley Hall, kindly took the time to pay the class a visit in Newbern. Because he’s an expert on the CNC-routing process, Jon is helping the students coordinate using the router to fabricate their millwork pieces. CNC-routing is a new and exciting adventure for the Shop Class, and Jon was incredibly helpful in giving an in-depth router tutorial along with some great advice on design and process.

Thanks Jon!

Presenting Ophelia’s Home

October 9, Ophelia’s Home was decided! The last two product line homes the 3rd-year studio considered were Mac’s and Joanne’s and the cut was made after a final sprint of drawings and a group discussion Wednesday morning. The 3rd-year students will be building an iteration of Joanne’s home for their client Ophelia.

The very same day the students presented their plans to Ophelia and her family. Here’s to last minute decisions! 

The 3rd-years set up their work on site, and Ophelia, her family, and Mrs. Patrick (last year’s 20K client and Ophelia’s neighbor) sat outside while the students presented Joanne’s Home and the specifics of how and why this home would be best for Ophelia.

The presentation included technical drawings but also a site model and with a version of Joanne’s that Ophelia could keep. The group then moved around the property to podiums of perspectives for the client to look and see the potential views of her new home from various vantage points.

The presentation to Ophelia concluded by walking through a one-to-one mock up of the new home where the students plan to build it, showing every rooms and the views from every window.

The 3rd-years are so excited to have chosen a home for Ophelia and she is so happy with the one they chose! And on that note, both are ready to build! Stay tuned as the studio takes their design into the dirt. 

Workshop #3 Emily McGlohn

Birmingham, AL native, Emily McGlohn, currently runs the 3rd-Year Studio in Newbern. She has quite a long history with Rural Studio participating as a student in both the 2nd-year and 5th-year studios, and after graduation spent three years as “Clerk of Works.” Before bringing her expertise on building performance and hands-on education back to Newbern, Emily spent several years working in Virginia and teaching at Mississippi State.

The Contemporary Enclosures workshop, taught by Rural Studio 3rd-Year professor Emily McGlohn, primarily focused on learning from past Rural Studio projects by studying them through wall sections. This allowed students to identify the reasons why Rural Studio has gone from the inventive use of simple materials in projects to using common commercial materials while building an understanding of performance, specifically through thermal-, air-, and moisture-barriers, as well as learning about detailed construction. By examining the progression of Rural Studio projects and comparing R-values, students saw the greater attention paid to building performance that has occurred over the years and the variety of building types that have been tested.

It’s important that students confidently design for our subtropical humid climate, to know things such as when to use a vapor barrier versus a vapor retarder. After having looked at so many Rural Studio projects at a surface-level, students had the opportunity to study them in-depth through drawings, archived documents, photos, and in person. The drawings that students produced ended up being more accurate and detailed than the construction documents. Through this process, students gained both a more intimate knowledge of how buildings come together piece by piece and a familiarity with a myriad of different construction types and building materials. It became clear to students that while earlier Studio projects may appear more creative and unique, more recent projects have the ability to be easily maintained by its owners and replicated outside of Rural Studio.

Students gained the tools to design for the mixed-humid climate that they live and work in, making these performance strategies a priority in their designs.